How tight should a furnace filter fit?

Can an air filter be too tight?

Consequences of Using an Air Filter That is Too Small:

The filter can be sucked into the ventilation if it is much smaller than it should be. … Dust, allergens and pollutants will not be filtered from your indoor air, as the air is bypassing the filter and entering into the ventilation and is returned back.

Can a furnace filter be too restrictive?

All furnace filters have a MERV rating which indicates filter efficiency. … The makeup of these high-efficiency filters can be too restrictive for the unit, creating a barrier to good airflow. The HVAC system may struggle to pass air through the air filter and expend more energy in its attempts.

How are air filters supposed to fit?

Air filters have arrows printed on the sides of them that show you which way they are supposed to be installed. These arrows should be pointing in the direction that air flows through your system, which is away from the supply ducts and (typically) toward the blower.

Is MERV 13 too high for residential?

One factor to consider is air flow through the system. … In some cases, using an air filter that is too restrictive for your system may cause low air flow problems as well. MERV 13 is the highest MERV value safe for residential furnaces; the higher ratings are used primarily in commercial units.

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What happens if your furnace filter is too big?

If you purchase a filter that’s too large, it won’t slide into the slot correctly. If the filter is too small, it won’t cover the entire space and may allow dust and dirt to flow past.

How tight should your air filter be?

How tight should a Furnace Filter fit? When you remove the existing filter, take note of the dimensions printed on its frame. Your new filter will need to match this size for the system to run efficiently. It should fit snugly but not so tight that you can‘t easily slide the filter in and out.

What happens if furnace filter is backwards?

When a furnace filter is placed backwards, the fibers can’t do their job properly. This means your furnace has to work harder to generate the same air flow, resulting in increased energy costs. Particles are also allowed to build up irregularly, making the furnace working even harder to draw air.